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20110911
20110911
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> go ahead. >> he is a michigan boy. i grew up watching his work on flint. this actually shows his life before he was a filmmaker. i'm looking for a to seeing these stories from his life. >> we did a short interview with him in the paper today which would be by the time you see this last thursday and he describes it as not a memoir. it is sort of an anti mark, just some stories including i think he was 13 years of wandering around the capitol and got lost and ran into bobby kennedy. >> sentiment, a book by michael more. will that automatically be a large print run? >> i would say yes. >> i'm sorry. go ahead. >> he has such a big following online. go to his website and you can see all the people that are talking about this book. i think it will sell a lot of copies. >> well, two other well-known authors who might generate automatic large print runs, and economic books. sylvia nasser and michael lewis. grand pursued, the story of economic genius and boomerang, travels in the third world. what can you tell us about these two books, bob minzesheimer? >> well, probably best known for her las
. >> he is from michigan i watched his work on plant and shows his life before he was of filmmaker so i am looking forward to the stories from his life. >> we did a short interview with him in the paper i think today which was last thursday and described it as not a memoir but some stories including 13 years old and ran into bobby kennedy. >> a book by michael moore does that automatically be a large print run the? >> >> he has such a big following online. if you go to the website you see the people who are talking about the book i think it will sell a lot of copies. >> host: well-known authors who may generate automatic large branch runs our economic books. sylvia nasser comes out with grand pursuit and michael lewis, of boomerang troubles in the third-world. what can you tell us about these books bob minzesheimer? >> soviet is best known for her last book which is a beautiful mind which was the oxymoron in was helped by the fact that it became a movie with russell crowe. she has a big following. what she is trying to do is add some humanity and personality. this is a new idea that most p
and we are fairly close to where we should have been today, a few clouds drifted across like michigan but very little in the way of rainfall across chicago. 66 degrees in chicago but check out the numbers all over the midwest. it is very pleasant around here. tempters beginning to drop in some of the western suburbs. tonight's temperatures and the like are going to drop into the 50s. look at the dew point temperatures and you can say they are a little higher along chicago's lakefront. we're expecting some fog to form and already we're seeing it visibility nibbled away in some parts of the chicago area. there is some ran out to our east moving through parts of western pennsylvania into ohio and even indiana, maybe a few sprinkles in parts of the chicago area but this isn't going to amount to it too much. this is what our computer is suggesting. nothing of any consequence. tomorrow will be a beautiful day sunshine. our computer models are not generating much more than an occasional shower for any place in chicago most of the area should be dry. com winds expected. here is our forecast n
, chicago athletic association, continental room on michigan avenue. i write here that he traced a chillingly accurate picture of the danger posed by islamic fundamentalism and his potential to release a virulent strain of terrorism on the world. old ideas had to be updated. he explains to the spellbound gathering old risk assessment model was advised. understood in the context of muslim thinking and had to be factored into our thinking of how twisted people could use this theme to create large acts of violence. he wrote at the time of the world trade center bombing, they were putting most of the eggs into the basket of the states that sponsor terrorism. he went on to say if you look at the world trade center bombings people that had been charged and convicted, they were egyptian, pakistani, kuwaity, iraqi and even u.s. persons all coming together. individuals pretty much identified because of their freedom to move across borders, they are bound by a jihad, religious belief as opposed to any nation or state that can quickly assemble or disperse. they beat the russians and beat on
uc-berkeley with a double major in peace studies and english, go bears. she attended michigan state university law school. thank you. now they'v occ has three journal level investigators. we do have our charter mandated minimum of one investigator for every 150 police officers. it is wonderful news. thank you. that concludes my report. president mazzucco: congratulations and welcome to the new investigators. it will be an interesting read. the commission favors mediation. we appreciate your hard work. where are firm believers this strong and incredible occ makes for a strong and in kabul police department. poa joins in on that wit twoh steve johnson. any questions? >> item 3c. thepresident mazzucc>> the commg in the community. i would like to thank capt. sandford for his presentation and for officer broke the -- brophy. i said we are going to try to do more publicity to get more of the community there. i prefer to have more people there next time. the commission will take efforts next time in addition to what the district station capt. does in terms of putting out information but ha
touchdown passes as the ducks turn the school board into a pinball machine, 69-20. >>> michigan and notre dame sporting throwback unis. it was a classic, michigan came back from a 27-7 deficit and completed this pass to roy roundtree with two seconds left. roundtree only needs to get 1 foot down. he does that. wolverines 2-0. the irish 0-2. >>> 84-year-old penn state coach paterno in the box, the lions picked a field goal but it was all alabama after that. richardson with a 13-yard 4th quarter run for six. the crimson tide a 27-11 winner. >>> ohio state is supposed to bead toledo, especially at home. the buckeyes trailed as late as the 4th quarter before pulling it out. this one's an important momentum changer in the third. field takes a bunt. he won't be stopped until he goes to the end zone. ohio state hangs on 27-22. >>> defending national champion auburn taking to the limit. the tigers and mississippi state back and forth all day, the quarterback chris rough hits the helmet of bell. the ball goes to mcneal, mcneal goes 43 yards for a score, it came down to this, second and goal for th
to college? >> i went to michigan state university for journalism. georgetown university for theological studies. >> did you get a degree from georgetown. >> master's degree in liberal studies. >> in liberal studies. that includes, what, theology? >> theology, philosophy, yeah. >> do they teach you shakespeare? >> i managed to stay away from shakespeare at the master's level. >> you'd be comfortable there now because i understand even for literature majors shakespeare is not a mandatory subject, do you believe that? what has happened to these? >> reporter, covered politics, weekly pbs series john ander nathalie. "u.s. news and world report," religion editor. your book to your credit. >> my first book. >> and still working at "u.s. news & world report." >> i still am. >> if i mention the name funk to you, who is he, robert funk? >> he's a bible scholar, new testament scholar who is founder and leader of a group called jesus seminar. a group of scholars for the last 15 years have been exploring the historical jesus. >> yeah, does he have very much standing in the academic community paula f
. but the centers of my story are two small time criminal defense attorneys who work on michigan street. and if you get accused of a crime, those are the people you want to call. >> that's my approach. and they're both former public defenders, right? >> yes, they are. they are both former public defenders here in san francisco. without giving away too much of the story, there may be a return at some point to that particular office where they would, of course, be working for you. >> anytime. [laughing] there seems to be such a huge disconnect, you know, between what you see on tv and even what you read about. most of the tv shows like "law & order" you have a judge who's eminently fair, a prosecutor who is completely ethical, a defense attorney who doesn't show up half the time. these images really result -- i know this as a public defender, because the portrayals of public defenders are usually negative. why? i ask this to the entire panel. why is there such a disconnect between the reality of what really happens in our court and the way that many americans are force fed, really, this mythology? to
. and then on friday, university of michigan releases its latest reading of consumer sentiment. >>> and finally, today so many memories for me and for all of us as we look back ten years of september 11th. i was down here on wall street when the tragedy took place, the towers came down. i remember standing on the corner of wall street and broadway and watching the buildings collapse. i ran for my life as well as everyone else around me. as i recall and think about the friends and the family that i lost and all of us lost, i also remember the resiliency that happened down here four days later. and i have to tell you that september 17th for me probably was the proudest day of my life, watching the firefighters, the police, the governor, the mayor, all of the people in new york show such leadership, ringing the opening bell on september 17th, and getting the markets open again. i remember thinking america will rise again. we were hurt. we lost our loved ones. we lost family. we lost friends. but we knew we would rise again. and even though we were hurt, we knew that america was down but not out. and my h
, michigan. good morning to you. this is a special edition of "new york post." go-ahead. you are on the air. caller: this is brian, calling about the 9/11 incident. i still believe it was an inside job. i have been studying every piece of footage i could get my hands on for the last 10 years. my conclusion out of my research is that it was a distraction. the buildings coming down, the two tower is coming down was a distraction. host: what happened to the people on board those flights? caller: there is true that they were let off somewhere else. host: caller, i'm one to stop you there. we're not going to spend the morning dealing with things that are completely fiction. we will deal with the facts and get your comments and reflections. caller: good morning. it is nice to speak with you today. can you hear me? hello? good morning? host: go ahead. caller: my memory is of september 9, 2001, c-span. i called during the 7:00 hour. you had a speaker who was advocating for the closure of overseas bases. i called in to voice my opinion that those overseas bases should not be called -- closed, that o
passengers and crew as michigan to fight back against the hijackers. ♪ ♪ ♪ oh beautiful for spacious skies fork amber waves of grain ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ america, god shed his grace on thee ♪ and crown think good with brotherhood from sea to shining sea ♪ ♪ >> we want to move on now to ground zero in new york where there was a very emotional ceremony earlier. fox news correspondent rick leventhal is there. >> reporter: chris, dark storm clouds have moved in to reflect a somber mood of this ceremony. as pairs of family members read groups of names of the near 3,000 who lost their lives on 9/11. they often give personal messages atd9[ the end when thy mention their father or brother or sister or loved one. after they read those names, they are able now for the first time to walk over to the september 11th, memorial, which is now open to families today and to the public on monday for the first time ever. it is a park filled with trees and grass and two very large waterfalls, built in the footprints of the twin towers. those waterfalls are ringed by brass plaques that include the
't you glad you brought him all the way from michigan? you bet i am! [laughter] you have faith. of course! he's gonna go home hearing! you've been attending this ministry many years. more than 30. more than 30 years. that's great. he also has a hard time focusing. okay. well, he couldn't hear good enough. now it'll be different. lord, lord, let him focus right, make good grades when he starts to school. come back to see me. what do you say? come back to see me. okay? say hello! hello. say it right in there: hello! [whispering] hello. say hello! [laughter] hello! can you say hello? hello. hello! yeah! say thank you. thank you. you're hearing. grandma's speaking from your blind side, which was blind, not blind any longer. not deaf any longer. we'd put him on the other side of the car so he can hear us. now he's hearing out of this side. you come back to see me, hear? we're buddies! we're buddies! he agrees! wave at those people out there. wave at them. [sound of rattle] [applause] children have faith. rev. angley, i was here in 2008, and god healed me-- i was slain in the spirit-- of chroni
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)